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Ayurvedic Diet

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Ayurveda, meaning “the science of life,” originated in India as a holistic approach to create balance within the mind and body by aligning oneself with nature. The belief is that disease results from an imbalance of the Doshas: Vata, Pitta, and Kapha.

Doshas are physiological types that every human exhibits some combination of. The three different types are based on the five elements of nature: ether (or space), fire, air, water, and earth.

Vata corresponds with air, and may indicate a flighty nervous system, inconsistent behavior, and light-heartedness. Pitta represents fire, and usually means a strong personality, leadership qualities, and intense emotions. Kapha primarily represents water, exhibited in a slow, steady demeanor and strong loyalty. Although combinations are common, there is usually one dosha that is dominant.

According to this theory, by eating in accordance with one’s Ayurvedic body type (or dosha), balance and good health can be restored. The Ayurvedic diet focuses on the six basic tastes: Sweet, sour, salty, bitter, pungent, and astringent. The Ayurvedic approach usually includes a combination of yoga, breathing exercises, meditation, mantras, cleanses, and massaging the skin with dosha-specific oil.

Foods to include: 

Vata Dosha: Warm, cooked, nourishing, and easily digestible foods, such as:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruit
  • Rice and wheat
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • Mung bean dahl
  • Low-fat dairy
  • Tofu
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Healthy oils

Pitta Dosha: Cool, raw, or lightly cooked foods, such as:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Wheat, rice, barley, and oats
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Egg whites
  • Milk
  • Butter
  • Ghee
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Healthy oils

Kapha Dosha: Light, warm, and spicy foods, such as:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Barley, corn, millet, buckwheat, and rye
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • Beans
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Healthy oils

Foods to avoid:

  • Vata types: Cool, non-digestible foods, and sugar.
  • Pitta types: Foods overexposed to heat and light, fried, and spicy foods.
  • Kapha types: Greasy foods and processed sugar.

Pros:

  • Honors bio-individuality
  • Focuses on prevention
  • Considers primary food
  • In line with the seasons
  • Emphasizes whole foods

Cons:

  • Scientific evidence is limited
  • Diet may be limiting for some people
  • May be difficult to find specialty foods 

 

*Please take note that when I reference any particular diet within my website, blog, and all other social media platforms, I am only posting information on different types of diets, and I am NOT suggesting that anyone simply go forth and follow any particular diet in which I post information on.

I am a firm believer in Bio-Individuality, which means that there is no "one-size-fits-all" diet. The core concept of bio-individuality has been proven by science, and it is vital for me to always focus on bio-individuality when working with my clients. This is also another reason why it is so important for people to work one on one with a Certified Holistic Health Practitioner or Certified Holistic Health Coach. Anyone can simply google absolutely any topic or diet that is out there on the internet, however there will be hundreds of different answers and theories in regards to everything that’s on the internet nowadays.

There is so much I would like to write on Bio-Individuality alone, that I plan to write another Blog Post specifically on this topic.

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